They All Laughed

andrewinfante:

Sergeant Rutledge (John Ford, 1960)

Colossal Youth (Pedro Costa, 2006)

Damn

Any effort persisted in becomes corrupt. The sense of duty that sustains Ford’s individuals (and also their sense of faith) commonly leads them astray into aberrations or death. Duty-bound, they invade others’ privacy, and arrogate knowledge of higher good, right and judgment: judges, ministers, soldiers, outlaws, priests. Thus racism, war or any form of intolerance becomes a function of society. In tracing Ford’s pictures (particularly Judge Priest, How Green Was My Valley, This Is Korea!, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance) we have seen how people (and governments) act from feeling, not from logic. People are made of dreams as much as reality. And we have seen how Ford, in awakening around 1927 to cinema’s ability to be art through total stylization, awakened simultaneously to his art’s high task: to help us free ourselves from determining ideologies. Art, after all, has the capability of making us understand things through emotion that we would be absolutely incapable of understanding through the intellect. Within a determining milieu, particularly when that milieu is challenged, free will, human nature, life’s worth, a benign divinity’s existence, all must necessarily be posed in question. And so Ford pictures ideally construct in minute detail a social set of apparent homogeneity (thus often military-like) in order to analyze that society within its historic moment, and in order to demonstrate how the garments of society, together with history itself, operate on the individual. It is for these reasons that Jean-Marie Straub has called Ford the most ”Brechtian” of all filmmakers.
Tag Gallagher, John Ford: The Man and His Films (via jevoussaluespinelli)
I like a lot of films from the 70s. I don’t like to speak specifically because sometimes people get offended. But, my taste runs from The Godfather to Julien Donkey-Boy, so it’s hard to pin me down on that subject.
Sylvester Stallone (via iwanttobelikearollingstone)

Stallone been real

Travi$ Scott - Backyard
3,620 plays

oldlean:

Backyard - Travi$ Scott

Freddie Gibbs & Madlib - Shitsville
85 plays

notxam:

Freddie Gibbs & Madlib - Shitsville 
from Piñata

kentuckeraudley:

Starstruck French teenagers who think @alexrossperry is Jason Swartzman.

kentuckeraudley:

Starstruck French teenagers who think @alexrossperry is Jason Swartzman.

In Praise of Love (Jean-Luc Godard, 2001)

In Praise of Love (Jean-Luc Godard, 2001)

Bruce Springsteen - Hungry Heart
113 plays

subjectiverandomness:

Track - Hungry Heart
Artist - Bruce Springsteen
Album - The River

vinylisheavy:

Last night, after ignoring the Ferguson developments to go see Leos Carax’s Boy Meets Girl at the Castro (read Cuyler’s take here; I thought, similarly, “that was ok”), I came home and rewatched a bunch of stuff my friend Isiah made. First off was this new trailer for the upcoming 88:88 (see above, dumdum). Then I watched Time is the sun.mp4. Then I tweeted a lot about how much I love what Isiah’s doing, in large part because you can tell that he turns his camera on his life not simply to document it but also to say, “I love you,” to everybody in it. Furthermore, they’re truly digital films, by which I mean mosaics—arrangements as much as compositions, pieces strung together to make a whole—or, maybe, gestalts. In this, his work inherits JLG like few other current filmmakers. Isiah’s work is much more private, and less “about” cinema (I guess), but, as I tweeted, meaning is secondary to feeling herein so anybody claiming this is incoherent can take the train to nowhere I want to be.

Kanye West - We Can Make It Better (with Talib Kweli, Q-Tip, Common, Rhymefest)
433 plays

We Can Make It Better - Kanye West

D. W. Griffith in France, 1917.

D. W. Griffith in France, 1917.

Love Streams (John Cassavetes, 1984)

Love Streams (John Cassavetes, 1984)